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An eBay acquisition.
An eBay acquisition.

I have a couple of these…

 
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An eBay acquisition.
An eBay acquisition.

From the Wahoo, NE store…acquired on eBay.

 
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Old printing block (image reversed for legibility).
Old printing block (image reversed for legibility).

I bought this at Frank’s Antiques on Farnam in Omaha in 1979. I’m not sure what it was used to print…advertising…product packaging? Any thoughts?

 
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…tails, you lose.
…tails, you lose.
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Heads, I win…
Heads, I win…

Anyone know if ‘buffalo’ (actually, it would have been bison) was sold during the founders’ era?

 
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Front cover of the recently-acquired Lyle DeMoss cookbook.
Front cover of the recently-acquired Lyle DeMoss cookbook.

When I get a chance, I’ll reproduce some of the biographical information about the late Mr. DeMoss, a venerable Omaha broadcaster. Perhaps in the meantime, someone reading this can explain the Hinky Dinky connection.

 
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Rare and valuable paperback book, late 1920s.
Rare and valuable paperback book, late 1920s.

Google it. These seem to fetch about $125 a pop!

 
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If you demand proof…
If you demand proof…

Several of you have challenged me on the “parlay voo” spelling. I’m aware of the correct French spelling of the phrase “parlez vous.” The song is not a French song. It’s an English song about English speakers’ wartime experiences. It’s about ignorant boys from Tuscaloosa and Herefordshire and Omaha whining about the army and hitting on French girls. The hook and title allude to boys with a tenuous grasp on a foreign language addressing the mademoiselles.

The history of the song itself is very, very interesting and leads to certain speculations about its’ true relationship to the company name. Those are posts for other days….

 
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Hinky Dinky Toy Truck
Hinky Dinky Toy Truck

If you’re a member of the target demographic of this site, there’s a great likelihood that this object is familiar to you. This example was a gift from a colleague of mine. He hails originally from McCook, Nebraska where many members of his household were employed by the local Hinky Dinky store a one time or another, himself included.

 
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“Hinky Dinky Parley Voo”
by Paul Cadmus, 1939
“Hinky Dinky Parley Voo”
by Paul Cadmus, 1939

If we break down this painting it appears to me that we have a drunk in a bar, reveling in song. That the song is titled after our favorite, ribald WWI song and depicts as it’s a focus, a man who appears to be old enough to have fought in ‘The Great War’ may be significant. The fact that neither the young man in uniform, nor anyone else seems to be joining him in song is interesting. Evidently, the accordion player takes requests and has a repertoire that belies his years.

Paul Cadmus’ body of work is often termed ‘homoerotic.’ The bottle is in front of our vocalist, so he’s buying the drinks. Perhaps the middle-aged gentlemen is attempting to seduce his companion, the only other figure shown with a glass. Or perhaps he’s just celebrating with a son who’s just joined the service and I’m reading far to much into the narrative.

Paul Cadmus’ page at Wikipedia

© 2012 Hinky Dinky Parlay Voo? Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha